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20130420
20130420
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those we love with a gun control bill. ( laughter ) jim. >> on wednesday, the senate blocked the most far-reaching gun control legislation in two decades. >> it needed 60 votes. it got 54. >> the gun control package is stopped cold in the senate. >> stephen: that's right! we cannot d didn't do it! whooo! ( cheers ) jimmy, jimmy, where's my balloon drop? and, folks, we achieved this victory, despite relentless pressure from special interest grieving parents being used as props by generalissimo glock-snatch over here who, following the defeat, took to the rose garden. >> those who care deeply about preventing more and more gun violence will have to be as passionate and as organized and as vocal as those who blocked these commonsense steps to help keep our kids safe. and i see this as just round one. >> stephen: just round one? so we have to limit the size of our ammo magazines but you get as many round as you want? ( laughter ) luckily, 45 brave senators stood tall to protect what they homeland most precious their "a" rating from the n.r.a., like republican senator and brylcreem stora
program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself 12 years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that we're way better at this, way better prepared, and trainin
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
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